Seek & Find

Study these pictures carefully and look for the hidden costs of running an educational theater.  Every season, Parkway Playhouse provides the community with engaging theatrical productions and young people receive life-changing educational experiences. There are several ways that the cost to provide these experiences are met since memberships and ticket prices do not cover all of our expenses.  Please seek and find some of these additional costs and consider making a donation this summer to support our work.  We will put it to good use for the items below and many more in the season to come.

SEEK AND FIND 2

A – Cool air and hot stage lights: the air conditioning units are fantastic.They make being in and watching a play much more comfortable. We have older stage lights which generating a great deal of heat. Combined we often have power bills around $600 per month.

B – Assistant in the scene shop: on-going, skilled scene shop help is critical. Right now, there are many weeks where the great Bruce Chuvala is on his own. $5,000 per season.

C – Director of outreach and education: with the conservatory program, Parkway Players, touring productions and other outreach, we are in need of someone to provide skilled guidance throughout the year. This will allow us to reach more people, young and old, and provide the actors with a trained mentor. $10,000 per year.

D – Royalties for all plays: we have to pay for the rights to perform the plays for each season as well as for our camps and conservatory productions.  $28,000 per year.

E – Set construction materials for one play: $500.

F – Intern/Apprentice program: instructional costs for the training the next generation of theater artists and technicians or just building self-esteem and team building skills: $6,000 per year

These are just some of the hidden costs that need your support. Recurring donations are a great way to support our work. Follow the link to learn how to create a recurring donation or simply email me and I will help you set it up: Jeff at jbachar@parkwayplayhouse.com

Personally, I’ve found monthly donations to be an affordable way to give to organizations while staying within my budget. Monthly donations are helpful to Parkway Playhouse as well, since they provide a consistent source of income throughout the year and we can be more efficient with our resources. Checks are also welcome.  

Whatever method of giving is most convenient for you is what matters. Your summer support is greatly appreciated and I hope to see you at the theater soon for Dial M For Murder and The Complete Works of Shakespeare (Abridged) [Revised].   

Sincerely,
      Jeff Bachar, Executive Director

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Tag Line: A Conversation About “Boeing, Boeing” with director Dwight Chiles

It was a few hours before opening night when I spoke with Dwight Chiles about his production of Boeing, Boeing at Parkway Playhouse.  Last year when he and Kristen Livengood were discussing what plays to do this year Dwight was pleased with the reaction audiences had to The 39 Steps which led to the conclusion that a fast-paced farce, with 7 doors, 4 different accents and one very awkward plot situation would go over very well.  

boeing awkward web

He knew it would be challenging because of the comedic timing necessary and the ability of the actors to handle foreign accents; however, during the casting process he found an ideal combination of actors with the skills to handle the material.  

boeing gretchen couch web

Dwight has a wide range of theatrical capabilities and much his experience and training is connected to Shakespeare who used music and dance in a variety of ways in his work.  Influenced by this, we will see a choreographed dance number (that isn’t in the script). Dwight likes to use music to set the tone and add comedic elements as well. He collaborated with Henry Williamson to find just the right music.   Listen for 1960’s pop music from Italy, France, Germany and the USA in the production. You might even hear a sixties-era commercial jingle or two.

boeing set webDwight designed the set as well. He researched other productions of the play, sixties fashion and design to give us a clear sense of time and place (a Paris apartment in the 1960’s).  Using his drawings, Bruce Chuvala created exactly what Dwight wanted.

See you at the theatre!

Jeff Bachar


To purchase tickets, click HERE or call (828) 682-4285
boeing boeing june 2 through 16
       Saturday, June 2 19 at 7:30pm (with complimentary Opening Night Reception)
Sunday, June 3 at 3pm (with post-show cast Q&A)
Friday, June 8 at 7:30pm
Saturday, June 9 at 7:30pm
Sunday, June 10 at 3pm (with post-show cast Q&A)
Friday, June 15 at 7:30pm
Saturday, June 16 at 7:30pm

The Tag Line: Input Requested

Hi. This is the first edition of The Tag Line, blog posts that I will be writing occasionally throughout the summer.  The topics will vary widely and I hope to get some input from you periodically.tag line plate

As I write this edition there are wispy, white clouds and blue sky over Burnsville.  The air is light and breezy and the rains have left the mountains feeling refreshed. We have apprentices and interns hard at work in and around the theatre.

Three productions are in rehearsal simultaneously: Boeing, Boeing; Oliver!; and our Reading is Alive production of Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Lots of creativity and logistics at play in anticipation of audiences’ smiles and laughter. The set for Boeing, Boeing is being constructed and painted.  It has lots of doors to accommodate the fast-paced entrances and exits of this great comedy. The cast of Oliver! has started with energetic singing and blocking with a large, talented cast. In preparation for performances in multiple counties the Reading Is Alive cast and crew are coming up with clever ways to emphasize literacy in all aspects of this production.

Even with all of this activity taking place right now we must start thinking about next year and our 2019 season of shows.   With that in mind, here is your first challenge: What theme should we have that connects all of the productions next year? Think broadly, what is a common element that links each production?  It could be emotional, practical, time-based, political or something else. This may be a little too abstract but your ideas would be welcome. (Leave them in the comment section of the blog post.)

Don’t worry.  If that first challenge is not specific enough here is another:

I’d like to know your  suggestions for shows for us to do next year.  What would you like to see on stage? Think about both musicals and non-musicals.  Please send me your thoughts. Let me know soon so we can shape next season together.

If you have any burning questions about the theatre that you’d like me to write about please share those with me as well.  Until the next Tag Line……

Jeff Bachar
Executive Director